Category: City of Boise

Cottonwood Creek: “It Will Cost a Pretty Penny”

It must have been a dry July when the City of Boise founders platted the first streets in 1863. They established the city in the channel of Cottonwood Creek. Although Cottonwood Creek is a large tributary to the lower Boise River, it can dry up for months between rain storms and snow melt. The natural… Read more »

Birders Gather Data for Cottonwood Creek Project

by Heidi Ware Carlisle, BSU Intermountain Bird Observatory The east end of Julia Davis Park in downtown Boise will be transformed over the next year. What’s now a mono-culture of turf with scattered mature trees will make way for a vibrant small creek with aquatic and riparian vegetation taking root. Willows, Wood’s Rose, Golden Currant,… Read more »

Cottonwood Creek: “A Great Source of Trouble and Expense”

A deep freeze had clenched the Boise valley for weeks and snow lay thick on the foothills. In mid-January the temperature shot up to a balmy 50 degrees and rain began to fall.  Day after day the rain continued. On January 21, 1866, according to the January 23, 1866 edition of the Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman,… Read more »

Urban Reserve Feels the Love

120 youth and adults took to the hillsides at the City of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lake Reserve in October to create healthier habitat for birds and reduce fire risk. Armed with shovels of all sizes, trowels, and even a post hole digger, the determined volunteers dug through the rocky soil to plant nearly 2,000 native… Read more »

Sagebrush is the Smell of Home

By Kali Nelson, US Fish and Wildlife Service The Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve in Boise, Idaho is a 44-acre urban reserve. It provides habitat for a multitude of species such as red-winged blackbirds, gadwalls, Pied-billed Grebes, snakes, and others. The welcoming paths give visitors a quick and easy way to add nature into their day…. Read more »

Volunteers Dig In and Dig Out at Hyatt Reserve

More than 90 volunteers made quick work of planting 550 shrubs at the City of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve on April 14 as part of the Boise River Enhancement Network’s cooperative project to improve wildlife habitat and decrease fire risk.  Re-establishing native plants and controlling weeds is recommended in the Boise River Enhancement Plan…. Read more »

More Than Waterfowl at Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve

By Heidi Ware, Education and Outreach Director for the Intermountain Bird Observatory Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve teems with birds. Birders come to Hyatt in droves for the excellent views of charismatic species like Ruddy Ducks, with their bright blue bills. Or the families of Pied-billed Grebes with their odd, croaking calls and cute zebra-striped babies. Birders and… Read more »

Why Do Beavers Eat Willows?

Have you ever heard of a beaver with a headache? Probably not. Beavers eat willow plants that contain the active ingredient in aspirin. And they don’t have to worry about child-proof caps. You can learn about the medicinal and traditional uses of many plants that grow at the City of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve… Read more »

Russian Olive Trees at Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve

By Conner Jackson A walk through the city of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve in the middle of the winter is a great time to see plants in their dormant phase. Especially easy to pick out in the winter at Hyatt is the Russian olive– a non-native small tree or shrub that grows in abundance… Read more »

Putting Down Roots at the Hyatt Reserve

Energetic groups of adults and kids spread out across the City of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve in early December in search of the fuzzy dry flower heads of rabbitbrush plants. The once-bright yellow flowers had turned a faded beige and harbored thousands of tiny seeds the volunteers carefully collected in paper sacks. Back at… Read more »