Why Do Beavers Eat Willows?

Have you ever heard of a beaver with a headache? Probably not. Beavers eat willow plants that contain the active ingredient in aspirin. And they don’t have to worry about child-proof caps.

You can learn about the medicinal and traditional uses of many plants that grow at the City of Boise’s Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve at the Hyatt Multi-Cultural Habitat Enhancement Project Open House on March 7 from 5:30-7:30 at the Boise Watershed, 11818 W Joplin, Boise 83714.

Roger Rosentreter Photo courtesy of Riverside Hotel

Plant ecologist, teacher and author Roger Rosentreter Ph. D will share his ethnobotanical knowledge of Idaho’s native plants. Martha Brabec, City of Boise Open Space Restoration Specialist will talk about invasive plants at the reserve and the ongoing control strategies.  BREN volunteer Conner Jackson will explain why Russian olive trees are being removed. Eric Willadsen of the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley will provide an update on the Hyatt Multi-Cultural Habitat Enhancement Project including upcoming opportunities to be part of this cooperative effort. The presentations start at 6:00 pm.

Before and after the presentations, you can visit with representatives from the Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign, Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Idaho Firewise, Community Native Plant Nursery, Boise River Enhancement Network and more. The educational exhibits at the Boise WaterShed will be open for the kids to enjoy during the open house.

Community Members Grow Native Plants for the Reserve

With spring right around the corner, Hyatt Multi-Cultural Habitat Enhancement Project partners are preparing to transplant native plant seedlings from germination trays into cones for the summer growing season. Over the past three months, volunteers planted more than 50 germination trays with seeds gathered from the reserve and other Treasure Valley locations. Members of Girl Scout Troop 105 pictured below are growing two trays from seeds they planted in January. Those plants will find a new home in the reserve next fall.


Weeds Warriors Comes to Hyatt Reserve

The battle to control weeds at the reserve begins anew in the spring, and this year Weed Warriors will be trained to tackle the task. Weed Warriors are specially-trained volunteers who adopt specific areas to pull weeds on a regular basis.  According to Martha Brabec, Weed Warriors made a difference in the foothills in 2017, and she’s excited to provide a training specifically for the Hyatt Hidden Lakes Reserve on April 25. Field trips to the reserve for new residents from many nations and others will also be on the project schedule for the spring when migrating birds are at the reserve.

Improving Habitat and Enriching Lives Together

Seedling planted by volunteers at Hyatt Reserve. Photo by Art Robertson.

The Hyatt Multi-Cultural Habitat Enhancement Project is led by the Land Trust of the Treasure ValleyBoise River Enhancement Network, and the City of Boise. Project partners include U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Office of Refugees by Jannus, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Idaho, Golden Eagle Audubon Society, Intermountain Bird Observatory, Boise State University, The Wetlands Group, Idaho Fish and Game, Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign, and Partners for Clean Water. The goals of the project are to establish bird-friendly, fire-resistant vegetation on hillsides at the reserve and help community members of all backgrounds connect to this unique outdoor space.